New Design Carve

This is hot off the Journeyman. Tried a different technique I’ve never done before, by taking some of the elements of the design and creating new components slightly raised up over the original model to give some perspective. Needs some cleaning up before finishing starts.



Finally got around to finishing this beach scene. Only wood stains used, mostly dry brushed. Also making to side panels, a triptych. Carving the sides tomorrow after I get some more wood.
Below are test carves done in building insulation. They’re relatively cheap (a 4x8x2" board is about $55), especially when compared to most hardwood. I try different settings sometimes, even stopping the carve, tweak the settings in Aspire and then start the file over to view the changes.

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Looks great. What bit did you use and what type of wood?

Awesome work there Thomas, looks amazing. Are you planning on tinting or painting over it, or leave it natural wood?

-Alex

Thanks! 1/4" EM to rough, 1mm TBN for finish pass. Total 7 hrs.

I use various stain shades, glazes and stains tinted with acrylics then top coat with water based clear.

Fabulous! Please post some more pics after finishing!

Forgot the type wood. The beach scene is walnut, the mackerel is monkey pod, the flag/eagle is walnut. The tuna was cut on a piece of wood that originally was a charcuterie board I bought at The Home Store for $9.Took the short legs off the back and cleaned up the epoxy they used to glue them on.

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Will do. Thanks for the great compliment!

Wow that’s amazing!!

Thank you, Tim. I appreciate that

Hello Thomas, great work, very impressive. Question: when you say “creating new components slightly raised up over the original model” is that a separate carving that you glue to the final piece?

Actually, no. In Aspire I draw vector lines around an item I want to manipulate, example, the lounge chairs.

I then create model components from the vectors. I then can raise or lower them, tilt them or fade them.

It’s a lot of work to outline the pieces, then node edit them , then create and adjust the model to my liking. That’s why I use the cheap foam to test the new models.

The image I use is transferred from drawing sw as a bitmap. I create an initial model from the bitmap and use the bitmap as a “skin” over top of all the other models created. Doing it that way puts the texture onto otherwise flat or rounded models.

Some electronic smoothing and other sculpting is done to refine certain areas.

Hope this makes sense.

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I use illustrator as I am a graphic designer. Everything you explained makes sense but what do you mean by “create model Components”? thank you for the help.

In Aspire, you can take a vector and change it into a component by giving it one of six different shapes. With each shape, you can change the degree, the height the base and so forth. you can then combine these different shapes to create a model.

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That’s what, in my long-winded explanation, I was trying to say. Thanks poppyscott for clarifying.

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Very impressive, detail work. thanks for sharing!

Thank you sir! I’ve been following yours too, impressive work as you said