Loud grinding noise after homing

I fired up my x50 so i could scribe for the waste board.the machine was home but i accidentally hit home the machine. it started making noises trying to move in x direction. i had to hit e stop when it wouldn’t stop. now it makes a grinding noise on left side when i move in x direction. the noise is only for the first 2 inches then its fine. does this whether i’m going left to right or back right to left.but only on the left side of machine.it didn’t do this before i homed the machine from home position. I’ve seen some post about checking the blue wire or tightening the coupler or something like that. will look at these after work today. Anyone have any ideas? thanks

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We’re you ever able to get this fixed. I’m running into the same thing.

It hasn’t again. I just make sure not to home machine when it’s already home

Right lol… keep it simple

So I think found my problem. These are the wires coming from my X stepper motor

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Hey bob01dog,

wow, nice :slight_smile: Was this already there on receipt of the machine or how did you manage to achieve this?

@bob01dog

I have a dumb question, because I don’t yet have a OneFinity machine. How come every photo I’ve ever seen in the forums has a gap between the stepper motors and where the outer sheathing is on the cable?

Did the wires come like this with the outer jacket cut back that short or does it pull out from extended use?

The reason I’m raising this question is because I see the cables mentioned frequently as something to consider and I used to work on aircraft. We NEVER left the individual conductors with only their sheathing exposed because of breakage and chafing. I’m wondering if from a design perspective, this needs attention. :face_with_peeking_eye:

Hey Timberly,

Seems so, here’s the X-50 stock stepper page

@Aiph5u @Timberly No, I don’t think so. I’ve had the machine maybe a year now I started to hear a grinding noise. Got on the forum, watched youtube and voilà, there is my problem. Not sure how the wires got kinked like that, it’s about 10 mm off the stepper motor. Not a ton of room for repair. Anyone have a suggestion?


I have thoughts on it, but I’m hesitant to tell you, go for it.

Firstly, I searched around on the web and found that almost all steppers that matched the specs Aiph5u posted above are coming out of Asia. I was looking for European or North American produced steppers but hadn’t found anything. Bummer. I did find one image of what I was searching for though. A thicker outer jacket was used on the cable and heat-shrink covered the wires and passed through the grommet into the motor housing.

Secondly (and this is just me), If I knew I was going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d see if it was sealed. If not, I’d disconnect everything, pop the cover and see if I can cleanly solder or replace those wires coming out of the housing. I’d feed the wires out a good 5-6 inches and then stagger the lengths, so that each one was about 2" (50mm) longer than the next. This allows for a sealed solder joint that doesn’t add bulk concentrated in one location and it permits the rest of the wires to keep flexibility. Additionally since the cable is moving, I’d keep the solder joint smaller to minimize the overall length that’s more rigid. Keep in mind, that if you were really good, you’re looking at a 1/4" (maybe 7mm) solder with a 1" (maybe 25mm) heat shrink overlap to seal the joint. This is why you need staggered lengths and the same wires on the other side staggered in the reverse direction. It is also worth finding softer heat shrink for more flexibility.

I’m comfortable to do this on a non-sealed motor. But I would also be accepting that the only alternative is that I had to buy a new motor anyway. Just like wood tool usage, If you’re not comfortable doing a task, don’t do it. New motors are about $50.

Keep in mind that depending on how the wires are inside the housing, this may not be possible at all. I’m just thinking about how to salvage.

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Hey bob01dog,

I assume you have no experience with disassembling stepper motors? If you have, that would be the most correct way to replace the wires and maybe additionally to put a strain relief on the cable to prevent happening this again. I would also see the possibility to simply cut the wires where the breaks are and resolder, but you have to be a master in soldering with that short ends. Another possibility is to cut at the cable breaks and crimp wire ferrules to the wire ends, which then can be put into screw terminals or screwless terminals, e.g. into a WAGO through connector. Wire ferrules would have to have the size matching the wire gauge exactly. The color code for wire ferrules is here.

There are also butt connectors like this insulated for 0.5 – 1.0 mm² or for 1,5 – 2,5 mm² or this non-insulated for 0.5 – 1.0 mm² or this for 1.5 – 2.5 mm² (needed dies: 974910 or 974930 for non-insulated or 974906 for insulated connectors) that can be directly crimped on the wire ends. See here for details on tools needed. Here the same applies as said above: Crimp tool and crimp connector is required to match wire gauge!

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That style of through connector from WAGO is very convenient in a pinch. Nice find!

Oh, I’m going for it… I’ll see if can open it tomorrow and take some pictures and get back with you, I really don’t have anything to lose.

Be clean inside the motor. Use a good flux and a good solder. Twist the strands, put flux, then tin them with a thin coat of solder (like dripping a small bead from the tip of the iron). The flux will pull it in without it being too much solder.

Slide the shrink over first or you’ll kick yourself. Then get a couple of alligator clips or something to hold the wires still with yet a tiny bit more flux so that they don’t move and you don’t roast your finger tips. Get a heat gun, not a lighter and slowly shrink around the colored sheath. … puuuuurdy.

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Hey bob01dog,

there are also butt connectors like this insulated for 0.5 – 1.0 mm² or for 1,5 – 2,5 mm² or this non-insulated for 0.5 – 1.0 mm² or this for 1.5 – 2.5 mm² (needed dies: 974910 or 974930 for non-insulated or 974906 for insulated connectors) that can be directly crimped on the wire ends. See here for details on tools needed. Here the same applies as said above: Crimp tool and crimp connector is required to match wire gauge!

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and @Aiph5u I just happen to have some Wago connectors. I really do appreciate the both of you.

Hey bob01dog,

WAGO connectors, the eternal problem solvers :wink:

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@Aiph5u
I’m most impressed how you appear to be a living Wikipedia. I love it.

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Hey Timberly,

the secret to be a good smart ass is to maintain good and well-sorted bookmarks.

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