Huanyang VFD and Pump Wiring Diagram Review

Good evening, all.

I just ordered an Elite Journeyman a couple of weeks ago. I’m going to run it with a Huanyang 220V 2.2KW Spindle.

I was hoping to get some feedback on my custom wiring diagram for my Huanyang VFD. I have a bunch of questions about it (written on the diagram and copied below).

  • Is the “stop” signal that is sent from Masso to the VFD when the Masso E-stop is pressed safe enough? Or should the ‘ES’ TTL signal from Masso be wired to a VFD input as an emergency stop signal?
  • Is a GX12 connector (cable side) included with the Onefinity kit?
  • What type of cable is recommended for the signal lines from the Onefinity GX12 spindle connector to the VFD? How many conductors? Any fancy shield or termination?
  • Right now the Masso controller has no way of knowing if the VFD is in a fault state. Is that a problem?
  • For the power cord from the NEMA 14-30R wall outlet to the VFD, can the cord be made out of the same 16AWG 3+PE cable used for the VFD to spindle cable? Will the neutral (W) line need to be tied to anything or should it just be terminated in a wire nut?
  • Is the EMI filter before the VFD recommended/necessary if the VFD is the only load on that circuit and it is wired with double shielded cable?
  • If I switch to a better 110V pump in the future, would I simply need to swap the ‘220V Hot L2 (Y)’ with the neutral line ‘W’?
  • What would be the best way to power the flow sensor: 24V from the Onefinity Power Supply, 24V from the Masso, 24V from the HY VFD, or 24V from a separate power supply?
  • Any typos?

Also, if you have any questions or suggestions, I would love to hear them!

Thanks,

Josh

Hey Josh,

an emergency stop button shall not interrupt the power of a VFD. The only way to stop a spindle, including emergency stop, is to use the STOP mode of the VFD (either through front keypad, modbus command, or programmable input terminal with STOP function assigned to it). Some VFDs additionally have an emergency circuit support, like Omron MX2. See VFD manual. According to the updated IEC 60204-1, a VFD’s spindle STOP command is considered as a valid Safe Torque Off (STO) that fulfils the stop category 0 requirement (so allows to e.g. safely manually change the tool in this state).

No, but a ready-to-use cable is available, see link to GX-12 below.

For signal cable cross-section area, see VFD manual.

For GX-12 VFD control cable pinout and sources, see here:

If you use a VFD with single-phase AC input (which is the case if you have 110/220 V split-phase electricity), you need a 2+PE cable. If you use a VFD with single phase AC input on your VFD, the single-phase input current is about 2.5 x higher than the three-phase spindle output current, thus requiring a cable sufficient for such current. Remember a VFD is an AC-to-DC-to-three-phase-AC inverter. See input current specification of your VFD:

Images: Here you can see the nameplates of two 220 V VFDs for single-phase input for a 2.2 kW motor. As you can see, the max. input current is 24 A, which would require a 2+PE power supply cable of 6 mm² cross-section area (AWG 10), at least 4 mm² (AWG 12).

On the VFD input side, if you use 230 V from split-phase electricity, you only use the two hots. You need a 2+PE cable for this. The neutral is only necessary to grab a 115 V suplly if you need it.

On the VFD output side, there is no neutral, as there is no neutral on a spindle. The wires are U, V, W and PE, and shield. See here

An EMI filter is the most recommended accessory for a VFD. :warning: Be sure that the EMI filter is made for the VFD rated input current (here: 24 Ampères in the example above for a 220 V VFD for 2.2 kW spindle. An underdimensionated EMI filter is dangereous because the current constantly flows through its capacitors, so they have to be rated for that current.

Note that many cheap no-name / Huanyang spindles simply omit the VFD input current specification both on their nameplate and VFD manual. See Incorrect or missing data on cheap chinese VFDs and spindles for details.

If you have split-power electricity as is common in North America domestic areas, 230 V ist between two hots and 115 V is between one hot and neutral.

Usually you have a 24 V supply like Meanwell MDR10-24 or a MDR20-24
in your VFD control cabinet to drive the safety relay etc. (e.g. Omron G9SE). Using a separate power supply like this avoids concern about how the 24 V is connected to other things.

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Thank you so much Aiph5u!! You truly are the god of this forum. I was hoping you would reply!

an emergency stop button shall not interrupt the power of a VFD. The only way to stop a spindle, including emergency stop, is to use the STOP mode of the VFD (either through front keypad, modbus command, or programmable input terminal with STOP function assigned to it). Some VFDs additionally have an emergency circuit support, like Omron MX2. See VFD manual. According to the updated IEC 60204-1, a VFD’s spindle STOP command is considered as a valid Safe Torque Off (STO) that fulfils the stop category 0 requirement (so allows to e.g. safely manually change the tool in this state).

That’s great to know that the standard stop signal sent by Masso upon pressing the E-stop is enough. I saw in the Huanyang VFD manual (below) that a VFD input can be configured as an Emergent Stop (below), but that seems like it would cause a latched fault that also requires a reset signal, and I’d rather Keep it Stupid Simple.

Seems like it should be included (to ensure compatibility), but that’s alright. I’ll make my own. I’ve been a little iffy on PWNCNC ever since I saw him cross-thread the ‘Kool Connectors.’

My manual decided to use a hilariously tiny superscript on the dimension mm2 so I was left thinking it meant 0.52mm diameter (which would be ~24AWG), not area (the correct size is 20AWG):

Input current specification of the Huanyang VFD seems to be MIA which is a total PITA. It’s not on the plate nor mentioned anywhere in the manual (as you have previously noted in another thread).

Output current is 11A so I’m left to assume that it should be comparable to the 220V 2.2KW inverters you listed with an input current of 24A.

I will over-spec my EMI filter!

Good point. If I had the money I’d buy a Datron, but I’m pinching every possible penny. I’d like to, if possible, get away with powering the flow sensor off of an existing 24V supply. But I agree thoroughly that a separate supply would be best.

I think I’ll tie the flow sensor into the Masso’s 24V since that will reduce wiring length and complexity. The 5-24V sensor I’m looking at will only draw a maximum of 10mA at 5V, so it should be roughly 2mA at 24V if Ohm’s Law still applies in this lawless world.

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